Thursday, 15 March 2018

Intermission


Scarfolk has been bringing you archival artefacts for 5 years and it's time our council archivists took their mandatory break to get blood transfusions. So, we're having an intermission.

But this doesn't mean the end of Scarfolk...

We are very pleased to announce that we are now at work on a new Scarfolk book - a Scarfolk annual - which will be published by William Collins, an imprint of HarperCollins.

The makers of Scarfolk are also currently very busy making a new, short animation series called Dick & Stewart about a boy and an eyeball who struggle to survive in dystopian Britain. It's being produced by Rook Films in the UK & Matador Content in the US and stars Julian Barratt.

For more information please reread.

Thursday, 8 March 2018

Opportunity Doorways For Women (1976)


The Opportunity Doorway scheme for women was launched in 1976. Here's an excerpt from the council's literature:

"Scientific studies conducted by some of the finest minds in the Gentlemen's Science Club of Great Britain clearly show it’s not your fault that you were born female.

But that doesn’t mean you are entirely blameless for your irresponsible birth. Lazing around the house all day looking after infants and cleaning your husband's home is all well and good for a few years. But what happens after that, when you have become redundant?

Enter The Opportunity Doorway scheme, which has been designed specifically for you. It won't dig into your housekeeping allowance and you won’t have to worry about reading anything complicated; however, a head for heights is recommended."


See also: International Women's Day 1970, romance novels, birth, sexual reproduction in females and Bastard Lanes for single mothers.

Friday, 2 March 2018

Illegal Resurrections (1974)


A 1973 county survey showed that, after all deaths and births had been accounted for, there was a surplus of citizens, approximately 665 in total.

This was due to the practice of inserting deceased people's hearts into inanimate objects to bring them back to life. Grieving family members were most likely to attempt the process but there were also a few hobbyists and human traffickers.

Once the heart had been placed in its new host body, over which a medi-legal incantation had been recited, the object would become imbued with the personality of the deceased. However, there were often side effects, for example not being able to say certain words such as 'artichoke', 'help' and 'please kill me, I did not give my consent for this', to name but a few.

Hearts were usually placed inside humanoid objects: dolls, mannequins, large soft toys and the like, though one widow had her dead husband's heart inserted into a guinea pig called Jonathan who flushed himself down the toilet after his application to do an MA course in Linguistics was rejected.

See also: illegal ventriloquism, living toys, Mr Liver Head, organ tax, recycling surgical waste.